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Referencing, citations and avoiding plagiarism (MTU Kerry): Home

Referencing, citations and avoiding plagiarism (MTU Kerry)

MTU Kerry Anti ‐ Plagiarism Policy and Procedures

ITT Plagiarism Statement

The Institute of Technology Tralee Anti‐Plagiarism Policy and Procedure document approved by ITT, Academic Council 13th June, 2017, states that "The Institute of Technology, Tralee is committed to upholding the highest standards of academic integrity. Plagiarism undermines academic integrity and conflicts with the academic culture of the Institute. It also gives those who engage in plagiarism an unfair advantage over their colleagues. The Institute is committed to using transparent and fair processes to deal with allegations of plagiarism misconduct when they arise. It is the responsibility of all students to inform themselves fully on how to avoid plagiarism and to ensure the integrity of their work."

Definition of Plagiarism

As outlined in the Institute of Technology Tralee Anti‐Plagiarism Policy and Procedure document revised and approved by ITT, Academic Council 15th May 2017,

"Plagiarism, as that term is understood and applied by the Institute, is the presentation of the work of another (or of others) as one’s own work, without acknowledgement, in order to gain academic credit. Plagiarism also includes the recycled presentation of one’s own work previously submitted for academic credit and/or award. It applies to text, graphics, tables, formulae, code or any representation of ideas in print, electronic or any other media. Plagiarism can of course result from a deliberate decision to cheat, but it can also occur through carelessness, without any fraudulent intent. It is crucially important for students to familiarise themselves with correct referencing practices and the nature and boundaries of plagiarism. “I did not intend to plagiarise” is not an acceptable excuse. Plagiarism is regarded as a disciplinary matter."

A more detailed explanation of the The Institute's Anti‐Plagiarism Policy and Procedures and what constitutes plagiarism can be found in sections A5.2. and A5.25a of the Institute of Technology Tralee Quality Assurance Procedures. See below for links to these sections of the Institute's Quality Assurance Procedures.

In order to avoid committing plagiarism it is necessary to learn how to use citations and reference correctly at all times. This is covered in detail elsewhere in this online guide and a good place to start is with the Institute's brief guide to citations and referencing.

Academic Integrity

Institute of Technology Tralee, Student Handbook 2020: Student Rights & Responsibilities. Section 2.1 | Academic Integrity

All students are expected to approach their academic work with honesty and integrity. Students must comply with their academic programme requirements including satisfactory attendance, participation and they must undertake their academic work, study and research responsibly in a manner that is expected of a student in higher education. 

2.1 - ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Academic integrity is an essential component of third level education. All students must follow principles of intellectual honesty and standards to earn their qualification. Whether an undergraduate or post-graduate student, all examinable elements (e.g. continuous assessment (CA), project work, reports, dissertation, thesis, etc.) must be the student’s own work. It is accepted that in the production of assignments, students will use textbooks, journals, material accessed from the Internet, or other sources. Students must reference and acknowledge correctly by following standard referencing practice. Students must indicate when any material used is being quoted directly and citing the source. Students must acknowledge also the influence or inspiration of other sources even when they are not being quoted directly. The assignment bibliography should incorporate reference to all other people’s works and ideas using the standard referencing practice. Failure to comply with this standard may constitute an act of plagiarism. Prior to submission of any work that contributes to the students grades, the onus is on the student to ensure they have complied with QA procedure A5.25a Guide to Citations Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism (see below).
 
2.1.1 - Plagiarism
Plagiarism, as that term is understood and applied by the Institute, is the presentation of the work of another (or of others) as one’s own work, without acknowledgement, in order to gain academic credit. Plagiarism also includes the recycled presentation of one’s own work previously submitted for academic credit and/or award. It applies to text, graphics, tables, formulae, code or any representation of ideas in print, electronic or any other media. Plagiarism can of course result from a deliberate decision to cheat, but it can also occur through carelessness, without any fraudulent intent. It is crucially important for students to familiarise themselves with correct referencing practices and the nature and boundaries of plagiarism. “I did not intend to plagiarise” is not an acceptable excuse. Plagiarism is regarded as a disciplinary matter.
2.1.2 - Fabrication
Fabrication is defined as the falsification of data or information in any formal academic exercise. This includes making up data to back up arguments or inventing quotations. Data falsification is where false claims are made about research performed, including selective submitting of results to exclude inconvenient data and/or generating bogus data. Fabrication is a serious academic offence. 
2.1.3 - Collusion
Collusion is the presentation by a student of an assignment as their own, which is in fact the result in whole, or in part of unauthorised collaboration with another person or persons. All students involved in alleged collusion will be subject to investigation. This includes students willingly supplying unauthorised material (colluders) in the act of academic misconduct.

 

2.1.5 | Dealing with Academic Dishonesty or other academic offense(s) or misconduct

All suspected cases of  plagiarism will be  dealt with  through the Institute’s Anti-Plagiarism  Policy and  Procedures.

EARC  will investigate documented  instances of  alleged  plagiarism, fabrication, collusion  and  other breaches of academic integrity notified to the Office of the Vice President Academic Affairs and  Registrar. After  a  full investigation by  the EARC, the student may  be  disqualified, expelled  or  other sanction imposed as  deemed appropriate by the Committee.

Until the allegation of  academic  misconduct (plagiarism, fabrication, collusion  or other breaches of academic integrity)  against the student/graduate has been proven, all parties associated with the issue and subsequent investigation are required to observe confidentiality. A breach of confidentiality in relation to these matters will be regarded as a serious matter.


Excerpts taken from the Institute of Technology, Tralee, Student Handbook 2020: Student Rights & Responsibilities. 

https://www.ittralee.ie/en/pdf/RightsandResponsibilites.pdf